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101955 | UNITED STATES. Independent Order of Odd Fellows white metal Medal.

$295.00Price
  • Details

    101955  |  UNITED STATES. Independent Order of Odd Fellows white metal Medal. Issued 1869 for the 50th anniversary of the Order and for their convention in Philadelphia (50mm, 50.51 g, 11h).

     

    Three seminude female personifications (the middle winged, and representing Friendship, Love, and Truth) hovering above an old man seated to left with a cane, whom they help up, and a young woman with child, raising up the latter; above, radiant Eye of Providence; below, facing bearded head above clasped hands and banner reading FRIENDSHIP LOVE AND TRUTH / I O O F / GRAND NATIONAL / CELEBRATION / OF THE / FIFTIETH ANNIVERSARY / PHILADELPHIA / APRIL 26 1869 in seven lines; all within wreath of ivy and oak branches, with three rings. Edge: A few light marks, otherwise plain.

     

    Haseltine (1876/vol. II), 1693. Choice Mint State. Highly lustrous below a deep tone composed of smoky iridescence a great pullaway nature is observed around the devices and lettering; a few light marks prevent gem status. Quite rare this attractive.

     

    Ex Duplicates from the American Numismatic Society Collection.

     

    Created in 1819 by Thomas Wildey, the Independent Order of Odd Fellows has grown to become one of the world's largest fraternal orders. The origin of one of the most common forms of symbolism associated with the Order, the "three rings," isn't entirely known, though it possibly drew upon the triquetra symbol of the Holy Trinity. Alternatively, it may have emanated from an alchemical symbol alluding to mercury, sulfur, and salt, as representations of the spirit, soul, and physical body. It could have even been three clasped hands as a representation of fidelity and trust. In any event, the rings are presented here on the reverse, while the three female allegories on the obverse stand in for this symbolism in human form.

     

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